4 Modern Movies Adapted from Classics

Some stories are evergreen. They are told and retold in new ways, through new media. They are as relevant today as they ever were. Four of the most popular movie adaptations of well-known classics are listed below.

CluelessJane Austen’s Emma is about the eponymous heroine’s knack for matchmaking and keen eye for finding the perfect partner for everyone but herself. In its 1995 adaptation, Clueless, starring Alicia Silverstone, Cher is a poised teenager who is on the top rung of the social ladder in her high school, like Emma Woodhouse is in her village, Highbury. Having made two successful matches, Cher and her best friend Dionne (played by Stacey Dash) decide to take the newly arrived Tai Frasier (Brittany Murphy) under their wing. All goes well until Cher misreads a situation and Tai gets her heart broken. The resident cupid of Bronson Alcott High School makes a few surprising discoveries about her own feelings and, for the first time in her perfectly organized life, loses her composure.


10 Things I Hate About YouThis is adapted from the Shakespearean comedy, The Taming of the Shrew. Julia Stiles plays Kat Stratford, the present-day version of the infamous Katherina. The movie gives her a much deeper personality than the original. She is headstrong, cynical, and independent in a generally “unfeminine” way, which, of course, makes her undesirable to most men—especially in contrast with her affable sister, Bianca (Larisa Oleynik). But Kat is far from a shrew, and the movie deserves credit for voicing her opinions and not stuffing her into the “difficult women” drawer. Patrick, played by the legendary Heath Ledger, is a refreshing upgrade from Petruchio as he makes no attempt to “tame” Kat. It’s a delight to watch the two find their way into each other’s hearts.


Bridget Jones’ DiaryThe movie is based on a novel of the same name by Helen Fielding, which is inspired by the beloved classic Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen. Bridget Jones, played by Renee Zellweger, is the modern-day reincarnation of Elizabeth Bennet, with the same characteristic wit and tendency to get herself into awkward situations from which she needs to be extricated by her friends, who are her lifeline for surviving single life in London. Much like the Bennets, Bridget’s family, especially her mother, never fails to mortify her in public gatherings. Love seems a baffling mystery as Bridget trudges through heartbreak and disappointment and finds resonance in unexpected places.


She’s the ManAlso adapted from a Shakespearean comedy, Twelfth Night, this hilarious movie features Amanda Bynes as Viola who, after a humiliating fight with her boyfriend on the soccer field at school, goes to her brother Sebastian’s (James Kirk) private school, disguised as him, to cover for Sebastian while he goes to London to play music, his true passion. Viola, posing as Sebastian, gets an attractive new roommate in the form of Duke (played by Channing Tatum), and rises to become the star soccer player of the school with Duke’s help. Amidst a few secret crushes and a lot of confusion resulting from Viola hastily switching between her aliases, the day of the game against her old school arrives.

5 Books for Increasing Mindfulness

In our fast-paced and overloaded world, alone time has become a rare commodity. In contrast to the typical hustle and bustle of everyday life, extended time in isolation has allowed for some serious self-reflection. Although I adamantly dislike time alone with my thoughts, there is a lot of good that can potentially grow from these less-than-ideal circumstances. We often find ourselves mindlessly going through the motions in our daily lives, without investing time to reflect on where we are devoting our energy. This is the perfect time to take a step back and re-evaluate the way we are living our lives. As we prepare to head back out into the world, it can be worthwhile to take stock and look at the places where we invest our time and energy. In doing this, I found the following books to be instrumental to creating a life more firmly-centered around mindfulness, intentional living, and overall well-being.


Notes on a Nervous Planet— Matt Haig. Following the publication of his highly-lauded memoir, Reasons to Stay Alive, Haig wrote Notes on a Nervous Planet, a book about the ways in which modern society fosters anxiety and unhappiness. His book consists of bite-sized tidbits (that are somewhat chaotically arranged) to advise people on managing their anxiety in the twenty-first century. Haig likens our planet to a sentient being on the brink of a breakdown and explains how the modern world is one that deteriorates our mental well-being. This book is especially versatile in that it is broken up into small segments that are easy to digest and put into practice. The sections I found particularly useful include ‘Maybe,’ which speaks to the transient nature of happiness, ‘an excess of everything,’ in regards to our overloaded lives, and ‘What I tell myself when things get too much,’ a list of reminders when we are feeling overwhelmed.


The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up—Marie Kondo. While this may seem redundant give the title of the book, I can’t stress enough that this book will change your life. As a firm believer that the state of your living space reflects the state of your mind, Kondo’s book is revolutionary in that it offers tips and tools to create both an organized house and mind. On the surface, this book seems like it would have nothing interesting or practical to offer other than, you know, don’t make a mess. The KonMari method goes far deeper than this, though, and introduces a lifestyle centered around intentionality and mindfulness with your physical possessions. She urges you to only surround yourself with belongings that “spark joy,” and that doing this will simplify every aspect of your life.


Tuesdays with Morrie—Mitch Albom. Mitch Albom tells the story of his old college professor, Morrie Schwartz, who is dying from ALS. Instead of being angry or saddened by this news, however, Morrie chooses to focus on the wonderful gift of knowing that he is dying, and the freedom this grants him to live intentionally. Morrie spends his last months teaching Mitch—and, by extension, us—about where we should focus our attention in our lives. Tuesdays with Morrie is a book that I think everyone could benefit from owning and finding time to read once a year. Every time I come back to this book, I learn something new that I can apply to my current situation in life.


10% Happier—Dan Harris. Dan Harris was a newscaster with ABC when he suffered from a panic attack on live television. This event sparked a period of self-reflection in Dan’s life, and, through this, he found his way to meditation. A lifelong skeptic and nonbeliever in meditation, Harris’s book is written specifically for skeptics and lays out in no-nonsense, scientific terms how meditation can be beneficial for the mind and body. Instead of professing the life-changing nature of this practice, however, Harris remains a realist—he explains that engaging in mindfulness activities will make you 10% happier. When the stakes are so low, it’s hard to find a good reason not to introduce meditation as a habit in your life. 


The Little Prince—Antoine de Saint-Exupéry. This book might seem like an odd addition to the list, given that most of the other books here are of the self-help variety. Personally, I tend to be a bit skeptical of books that tell me how I should live my life, and that’s why I added Saint-Exupéry’s children’s book. The Little Prince is a well-loved classic, and for good reason—this story reminds us in the simplest possible terms where we should be focusing our attention in our lives. We as humans have a tendency to overcomplicate things, and this book is the perfect way to recenter and remind ourselves that “what is essential to the heart is invisible to the eyes.” A simple, oft-stated message, but one that is sadly kicked to the curb in our hurried and fast-paced lives. 

4 For Your Ears: Bookish Podcasts for the Summer

I recently began listening to podcasts to give my eyes some relief from screen and print. These podcasts represent a range of my regular listening—two are concerned with language itself, while the following two focus on book reviews and poetry readings, respectively. I’ve found them to be a great way to explore and revisit language, poems, and books. It’s my hope that you enjoy them as well!


The Allusionist—Helen Zaltzman. From swear tablets found in bogs around Bath (68, 2017) to how transfolk maneuver their words to match their experiences of gender (56, 2017), The Allusionist focuses on language in its funny, serious, creative, and everyday functions. There is an entire episode devoted to how apples get their names and another about polari (99), which was the argot that many gay men in England used to reveal and conceal identity simultaneously.

Zaltzman also includes additional material for each episode on the podcast’s website, https://www.theallusionist.org/. For the episode about polari, materials include a link to the Polari Bible, a link to Round the Horne (a polari-loving radio program that aired from the mid-to-late 1960s), gay language in the Philippines, and much more. Zaltzman might also be the funniest person around formally trained as a Medievalist.


A Way With Words—Martha & Grand Barrett. This podcasting duo composed of an author/journalist and lexicographer/linguist talk about family expressions, where words come from, current slang, and classic sayings. They’re like the teachers we all love the most—lively, engaging, thoughtful, and warm. More about the podcast can be found at: https://www.waywordradio.org/about/

In “Pie in the Sky” a 6 foot 8 listened shares his favorite pithy remarks to strangers’ comments about his height (2012). The same episode also covers why leg cramps are called charley horses, and where the phrase “pie in the sky” originated. “Had the Radish” (2019) centers on a phrase commonly used by a listener when fed up or worn out. The phrase came to the upstate New York listener from France by the way of Quebec. The French phrase je n’ai plus de radis—which translates to “I don’t even have a radish”—originally expressed poverty.


The New York Times Book Review Podcast—Various Hosts. Wide-ranging as The Times itself, the Book Review Podcast explores fiction and non-fiction alike with a variety of hosts guiding the program. Trends in the publishing world and literary criticisms are also common subjects. In the episode “The Angry Children Are Our Future,” an interview of Lydia Millet, author of A Children’s Bible—an allegorical novel about climate change and a family vacation—precedes a discussion of Barry Gewen’s The Inevitability of Tragedy: Henry Kissinger and His World.

The background of what constitutes a children’s Bible and how Millet’s novel departs from typical conventions of a coming-of-age tale offers material for contemplation for readers and writers alike. More about the podcast, including the option to stream content, can be found at https://www.nytimes.com/column/book-review-podcast.


Poetry Unbound—Pádraig Ó Tuama. “I need to feel the air in my throat and vocal cords constrict to make the poem real,” says the podcaster himself before he reads the poem “1383” by Emily Dickinson. He reads it well and follows the reading with his interpretation of the poem—how the fire described in the poem is like the fire that keeps friendship alive across distance and time. It’s a topical episode from late March of 2020, following the COVID-19 outbreak.

Other episodes are topical as well, though in a more general way. The episode “A Poem to See What’s Overlooked” offers a reading of a poem by Lemn Sissay that addresses what becomes forgotten. It’s a poem that demands remembrance, according to Ó Tuama, of the flat beer and missing buttons alike. “Like” is the word Ó Tuama brings our attention to throughout its repetition in the poem and his experience coming out as a gay man. Attentive and thoughtful, this podcast rewards the ears and the mind. More about the podcast can be found at https://radiopublic.com/poetryunbound-69qD3w/s1!30fd6.


Guest post courtesy of Nick Mueller

BIPOC Literature: Staff Recommendations from Black, Indigenous, and POC Writers

Given the current state of the world, it is more important than ever that we are united as human beings. Divisive issues should serve to remind us that we have much more in common than things that divide us. In standing with out black community, each of our bloggers and editors selected a novel they loved by black, indigenous, or POC authors. We hope this list serves as a reminder to spread love to your fellow man, and adds some new reading material from a wide variety of voices in our community!


Editor-In-Chief Mackenzie King

Lorraine Hansberry’s play, A Raisin in the Sun, is about a family who lives in the South Side of Chicago as they await the arrival of a life insurance check. It explores how each family member copes with their disillusionment of the American Dream while, at the same time, trying to improve their lives. The play helps to understand the limited opportunities that this family has and how the world around them is intent on keeping it that way. It is a powerful story, and very well written and illuminating. The characters are complex and their motivations are each different and shaped by how they have been treated by a systemically racist society up to this point. It is painful to read at times—and that makes it all the more important to do so.


Communications Coordinator Roxanne Bingham

Angie Thomas’s The Hate U Give follows 16-year-old Starr Carter, a black girl who lives in a predominantly white school. At a young age, she has to learn to navigate the two different worlds. She has always felt out of place in her school and knows she isn’t treated like everyone else. Her life is turned upside down when her childhood friend, Khalil, gets shot by a police officer at a party. This events causes her to re-think what she knows about the people in her life, and she realizes that her white friends don’t understand what she is forced to experience. When she goes to talk to the police, they are more concerned with Khalil’s character than with the events that took place. Starr is faced with a great injustice that should never have been present in society. She chases justice for her friend and learns the importance of a single voice.

This novel is extremely important as it mirrors current events and issues present in our society. A lot of districts have banned this book based on its language and graphic content, so it is important that people—especially students—have access to it. The message it conveys is very much applicable to current society, and everyone should hear it.


Managing Editor Jade Stanton

Tahereh Mafi’s A Very Large Expanse of Sea is set in 2002, following the events of 9/11, and tells the story of Shirin, a 16-year-old Muslim girl navigating high school. In addition to the typical struggles high-schoolers face, Shirin is regularly subjected to xenophobia, judgement, and stereotyping. Overwhelmed by these ever-present reminders of the dark side of humanity, Shirin has learned to build walls and block out the constant stream of negative attention she receives. Everything changes, though, when she meets Ocean—her lab partner who, impossibly, seems genuinely interested in getting to know her for who she really is. Shirin is caught trying to mix two seemingly irreconcilable worlds and worries about subjecting Ocean to the horrors she witnesses daily. Mafi’s semi-autobiographical novel sheds light on an often ignored perspective and paints in saddening detail the racism present in our world today.


Staff Writer Sharon Enck

Set in the deep South, The Color Purple by Alice Walker centers around a young black girl named Celie. Born into segregation, poverty, and extreme abuse, the story follows Celie in her quest to rejoin her sister, Nettie, escape the bonds of a dehumanizing marriage, and find herself. As uplifting as it is graphic in its description of Celie’s horrors, The Color Purple is an important piece of fiction. It was the first book, outside of school, that introduced me to the atrocities of being black in America. Its graphic descriptions of the mental and physical abuse, and the humiliation that Celie endured were jarring. At the time, I could have never imagined that kind of pain and suffering, and it opened my young eyes to the obstacles that people of color deal with every single day.


Staff Writer Abhilasha Mandal

Roma Tearne’s Brixton Beach is about nine-year-old Alice Fonseka, daughter of a Tamil father and Singhalese mother, who moves to Britain from Sri Lanka, the picturesque island that is fast being engulfed by the fires of a civil war in the ’70s. She leaves behind her mother’s family and her childhood friends, memories of the deep blue ocean imprinted on her mind forever. Exposed to racial violence from a young age thanks to the growing rift between the Tamil and Singhalese communities in Sri Lanka at the time, Alice faces a new form of hatred on the ship to England when she’s called a savage for wanting to eat with her hands. Alice’s mother fails to adjust to her strange new life in Britain, and it takes a toll on her marriage. As with most first-generation immigrant children, Alice Fonseka has to strive to find her racial identity, a struggle that is reflected later in her work as an artist and sculptor. She draws from the vivid memories of her childhood, picking rocks and shells on the beach beside her grandparents’ house. Brixton Beach is a saga of a family that was torn apart by civil unrest and migration. It paints the image of all the feelings that generations of immigrants have felt, and of how far social acceptance of people of color has progressed over the turn of the century.

9 Important Books to Read on Anti-Racism

Following the horrific death of George Floyd, many of us are wondering what we can do to help. From protesting to signing petitions, and from contacting our representatives to donating, there are a lot of things that we can do to dismantle racism in our communities. Another essential thing that we can do from home is to educate ourselves—we can learn about the systemic racism and structures of oppression, and we can address our own privileges and complicity. There are many, many resources on this topic, so it can seem overwhelming, but these nine books are a place to start. 


Barracoon: The Story of the Last “Black Cargo”—Zora Neale Hurston. Though Hurston is typically known for her fiction, this work of nonfiction is equally brilliant. She interviewed the last person alive who had been transported from Africa along the Middle Passage and sold into slavery. This work illustrates the tragedy of slavery as well as its lifelong impact and its lasting legacy. The story is both incredible and immensely impactful and is crucial for understanding America’s abhorrent past.


How to be an Antiracist—Ibram X. Kendi. Kendi brilliantly weaves together his own personal experiences with history, morality, science, and so much more in this book. He guides the reader to a deeper understanding of racism and its consequences, and leads them through a series of anti-racist ideas. It also provides the information about how to go beyond simply learning about racism and towards eliminating systemic racism in our society. It is a must-read book when it comes to anti-racism.


Race Talk and the Conspiracy of Silence: Understanding and Facilitating Difficult Dialogues on Race—Derald Wing Sue. This book in particular is about how to handle racism in day-to-day life. The author delineates how to have difficult and meaningful conversations about race. He insists that we need to drive through the resistance facing these conversations because remaining silent is being complicit. Derald Wing Sue gives realistic examples and his advice will stick with the reader and aid them in helping to produce an anti-racist society.


A Black Women’s History of the United States—Daina Ramey Berry and Kali Nicole Gross. Just as the history of black people is glossed over, the history of black women in particular is often outright ignored. This wonderful book centers on the stories of black women and their successes, despite their existing in a racist and patriarchal culture. Berry and Gross tell the history of many different types of women, from slaves to artists and activists. The authors present a complex and nuanced portrait, full of richness and detail. Understanding the history of oppression of black women will help create a fuller picture of the scope of racism in the U.S.


White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of our Racial Divide—Carol Anderson. Following the 2014 riots in Ferguson as a result of Michael Brown’s death, many were critiquing the outpour of “black rage.” This is what inspired this book, in which Anderson responds to the idea of “black rage,” posing instead the idea of “white rage”—the response to major advances in civil rights, which frequently results in violence, backlash, and attempts to repeal the progress towards equality. Anderson examines important events in history to illustrate this concept, and it is particularly timely during this new time of protest after the death of George Floyd.


Ain’t I A Woman?: Black Women and Feminism—bell hooks. Of course, this list would not be sufficient without anything by bell hooks on it. The author examines the intersections of race, gender, and class in this critical piece of feminist history. In particular, it examines the effects of racism and sexism on black women in contrast to white society. Additionally, hooks examines how feminism has ignored BIPOC women and women of lower socioeconomic statuses and the effects of doing so. Ain’t I a Woman? is critically acclaimed and necessary to read.


The Assassination of Fred Hampton: How the FBI and the Chicago Police Murdered a Black Panther—Jeffrey Haas. This book is about the murder of a young, prominent leader within the Black Panthers. The lengths that the FBI, led by J. Edgar Hoover, and the Police Department went in order to obscure how they murdered Hampton and to portray the Black Panthers as violent extremists is horrifying. This assassination was wildly influential in shaping how we view protests to this day, so reading this book will help to combat our unconscious assumptions.


Black Marxism: The Making of a Black Radical Tradition—Cedric J. Robinson. In this work, Robinson criticizes the inadequacies of the Marxist lens in understanding the history of black people. He also analyzes the development of black radicalism through lenses that are more appropriate, because they better take into account cultural and historical contexts. It is more academic than some of the other books on this list, but it is equally important.


The Possessive Investment in Whiteness: How White People Profit From Identity Politics—George Lipsitz. This book addresses the history of the category of whiteness and its cultural significance. He discusses how whiteness has been used to ensure dominance—both socially and economically—as well as how our society encourages people to invest in whiteness in order to maintain their status. Though it was originally written over 20 years ago, Lipsitz has updated it to include more recent statistics and topics, ranging from Hurricane Katrina to Trayvon Martin. He also includes his potent analyses of domestic terrorism and ethnonationalism and their causes, making it just as relevant today as it was in 1998.


Wanderlust Literature: 7 Travel Stories

In this new era of COVID-19, there are plenty of us staying at home suffering from a different kind of illness: cabin fever. Quarantine and isolation are entering their third month for many of us, and the spring season gaining traction isn’t helping at all. Spring typically motivates people to start new projects, clean out their homes and garages, start their gardens, and get outside. Unfortunately, for many people this still isn’t a safe option and may not be for a long time yet. For others, caution would still need to consistently exercised, but as local parks and trails begin to reopen, the opportunity to exercise some old fashioned social distancing by venturing out into nature might just be what the doctor ordered. Regardless of your options or what the future holds, a great way to scratch that itch for exploration is through the following books, each of which is able to spark that sense of wanderlust in their readers. The benefit of being a book-lover is that there are always worlds to explore inside the pages of a book, but, these books have the added benefit of offering a mental escape whilst reading that inspires real-life travel and adventure. So, let’s see if we can fight a little of that cabin fever with these seven books of wanderlust literature.


On the Road by Jack Kerouac—I’ve always been a sucker for the Beat Generation, and On the Road is one of those iconic pieces of work that has come to represent the genre. The novel follows characters that can’t seem to sit still, and as such can never settle down and stay in one place for too long. They definitely make some questionable choices along the way, but there is something to be said about their sense of recklessness in association with their constant search for meaning and adventure in their lives. This novel has a sense of restlessness that all of us can feel sometimes deep down—especially now that we are confined in our homes and hometowns. While this book probably won’t inspire you to engage in the same sort of shenanigans the characters are engaging in (hopefully), it just might inspire you to do a little soul-searching like they have, whether its while you are lost in the pages or on the open road yourself.


A Walk in the Woods: Rediscovering America on the Appalachian Trail by Bill Bryson—Bill Bryson has become a famous voice in the world of travel writing, probably because he writes with the tone of the uncle who seems to have a funny anecdote for everything. What is really appealing about him, though, is just how relatable he can be—he’s a regular guy who decided to undertake a challenge usually only completed by people who have trained their whole life to do. Spoiler alert: it’s a lot harder than he anticipated. But, it’s his persistence and his observations that make his account so enjoyable. Sometimes, it just takes an itch for adventure and discovery to push us out the door, and despite the challenges that this might present, the journey, not the destination, ends up being the best part of the story.


Walden: Life in the Woods by Henry David Thoreau—A book quoted by naturalists for the last hundred years or more, Walden is the ultimate memoir for the nature lover. Thoreau’s spiritual quest to connect with mother nature is recounted in great and quotable detail in this book. What’s so important about this novel in the current climate is the idea that isolation and solitude are not always negative things to undergo in one’s lifetime, and in fact can sometimes be good for the human spirit. Reconnecting with one’s self, beliefs, and nature itself is important for the mind, body, and soul—and what better time to attempt it? Meanwhile, enjoy this classic piece of influential literature and the enlightenment that it can offer.


Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer—This is a book that has been mentioned on this blog before, and for good reason—it’s a powerful and tragic true story of a boy who wanted to attempt something greater than himself. Idols such as Jack London, John Muir, and the aforementioned Thoreau inspired the love of nature and travel which sent Chris McCandless on his ill-fated journey. And though most of us know about his sad, lonely end, his drive to push on into the wilderness still inspires a sense of romance and wanderlust in the readers of his story.


Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail by Cheryl Strayed—Second only to the infamous Appalachian Trail is the Pacific Crest trail on the other side of the country. Reflecting on a painful divorce, the illness and subsequent death of her mother, and the influence of drug use, Strayed makes the decision to set out on the trail with no prior experience or knowledge if only to get moving to try to find something missing from her life. It’s also a familiar feeling, to feel powerless as one’s life spirals out of control, to want to run or move to try to escape your problems. On the trail, instead of running away, Strayed confronts her past and finds a sort of spiritual awakening in the different kind of difficulties she encounters there. While not the safest guidebook on attempting a hike of this magnitude, Strayed’s memoir is a truly a “lost to found” kind of story.


Eat, Pray, Love by Elizabeth Gilbert—In this well-known memoir about self-discovery, Gilbert travels across Italy, India, and Indonesia after a difficult divorce and a failed rebound relationship. At a certain point, we sometimes have to contemplate if we are happy with the way our lives are going. The bravery to make a change and to pursue your own happiness is a powerful message in Gilbert’s novel, and is something many people never had the chance to consider when we’re rushing through our work weeks and trying to make ends meet. This time to slow down can be used to take a closer look at our own happiness and to make the changes we need.


The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien—I seriously considered leaving this book off this list, but, I simply could not do it. The Hobbit is so near and dear to my heart that a list about wanderlust and finding yourself seemed incomplete without it. While it stands apart as a work of fantasy compared to the memoirs on this list, it is no less the story of Bilbo Baggins taking that first step out his door (with a little bit of a nudge from Gandalf) and discovering a whole new side to himself along an epic and dangerous journey. If we are confined to literature and fantasy to satisfy our cabin fever, then so be it, a trip from the Shire to the Lonely Mountain might just be the cure we need. And if it’s future real-life adventure you’re craving, The Hobbit, and all the other books on this list, are testament to what can be gained from taking that first step.

6 Best BookTubers to Watch During Quarantine

I started watching BookTube pretty recently and I have found that it is a great way to keep in touch with the literary community while we are all stuck inside. For those of us who are new to BookTube, it is the segment of YouTube that focuses on all things book-related. The content ranges from book reviews to book crafts, from funny to focused, and from YA books to classics. It is also an excellent way to find new books to read, or, to explore different genres. I picked these channels because they represent a wide range of BookTube styles. Whatever you are looking for, there is bound to be a BookTuber for you!


readwithcindy—First of all, Cindy is absolutely hilarious! Her self-deprecating humor adds a lot of flavor to her videos. She makes wrap-ups, which are summaries of all the books that she read during any given month and they are normally spoiler-free, as well as read-with-me vlogs. She also makes some artsier content, such as redesigning book websites or book covers, which are a lot of fun to watch.

What sets Cindy apart from other BookTubers is that she is staunchly against consumerism on BookTube. She only owns four books and gets all of her books from the library. She also promotes diversity in literature and hosts the Asian Read-athon. She is a bigger BookTuber who got her start pretty rapidly, but for every subscriber-count milestone that she reaches, she promotes smaller BookTubers. Cindy’s content is clever and engaging, so I definitely recommend watching her videos!

Here is a great introduction to Cindy’s channel: “i read my airplane seatmate’s trash romance book and it was a mistake.”


Merphy Napier—The biggest strength of Merphy’s channel is how focused it is. It centers strictly around “book” content and not “bookish” content, which means that she does not make videos about things that are only loosely related to books. She makes very typical BookTube content, such as reviews, wrap-ups, and rankings of characters and books.

Merphy is an author herself, so she also gives writing advice and has “Dear Author” videos in which she gives her opinions on tropes and book features. These videos can be pretty helpful for aspiring writers. I recommend her channel for people who enjoy more focused, book-related content.

Here is a great introduction to Merphy’s channel: “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone Doesn’t Make Sense?”


James Tullos—James’s channel mostly consists of very analytical videos. I love these because I get to learn so much more about the books that he reads than I would from most other BookTubers.

He mostly reads science fiction and high fantasy, such as Tolkien and Sanderson. Because the universes have such extensive lore, he makes a lot of in-depth videos about worldbuilding. James has a dry sense of humor that lends itself very well to his analytical content. He also does book reviews and top ten lists, all of which are very well made and entertaining.

Here is a great introduction to James’s channel: “Fantasy is very pro-monarchy (and that’s weird).”


Caleb Joseph—Caleb is one of my personal favorite BookTubers. His sense of humor is amazing and makes his rather lengthy videos worth the watch. His content is better classified as “bookish” because he will make videos about bad crafts involving books or about hosting a wedding for two of his books, in addition to traditional book reviews.

He will also make videos for book releases and do read-with-me vlogs, which are some of his best videos. Caleb reads a lot of “Bad Boy” romances, cringey Wattpad stories, and books that he knows he will dislike (which sounds strange, but all of this makes for absolutely incredible rant reviews). He mainly reads YA, so if that is your cup of tea, you will definitely enjoy Caleb’s content!

Here is a great introduction to Caleb’s channel: “Reading ‘The Worst Book of All Time.’”


paperbackdreams—Kat’s channel is absolutely adorable! She is the epitome of a classic BookTuber: she makes wrap-ups, book reviews, read-with-me vlogs, book hauls, and lots of collaboration videos with other BookTubers.

She has an awkward and adorable, yet calm sense of humor that makes her videos very watchable and enjoyable. Kat mainly reads YA books, like many other BookTubers, and the process of how she reads books is very relatable to many of us readers. For an introduction as to what a typical BookTuber is like, Kat’s channel is perfect.

Here is a great introduction to Kat’s channel: “let’s talk about ninth house…i guess.”


The Artisan Geek—I love Seji’s channel! First of all, she has the most lovely and relaxing voice to listen to which makes her videos super fun to watch! She also reads a lot of classics, which is interesting because many BookTubers focus on YA.

Seji makes a lot of videos about book hauls, her to-be-read list, wrap-ups, and she even reads stories out loud occasionally! She reads a lot of books from diverse authors, which is wonderful because BookTube can often lack diversity. I also love Seji because she knits and occasionally posts videos about her life. Her channel is really fun to watch and it is a great introduction to BookTube!

Here is a great introduction to Seji’s channel: “Diverse Classics Book Haul.”

Our Staff’s Favorite Places to Read

When I think of cracking open a good book, I immediately imagine myself in my favorite reading nook—nothing is more luxurious than relaxing in my spot of choice, book in hand. Inspired by the solace my own favorite spot provides me with, I decided to ask some of our staff writers what their favorite reading spots are, and why. So, if you also love a good reading spot, scroll down to find some new ideas for where to spend your page-turning time.


Rachel Hagerman

Editor-in-Chief

Favorite place to read: Outside 

Why: Whenever my family goes on vacation, whether it’s out in the mountains or on the beach, we sneak in a few hours of reading time outside. I love this little mini-vacation within our vacation, where I get to travel to a new fictional world with the sound of ocean waves in my ears or the shadows from a tall pine on my cheeks. Bonus points for any reading scene where a cacophony of nature sounds (I absolutely love to hear the birds singing to each other!) replaces your everyday traffic and crowd noise, so you can fully immerse yourself in the fictional world.


Sharon Enck

Staff Writer

Favorite place to read: In a big, squishy chair

Why: If there is one thing that I have discovered about myself, it’s that I can read anywhere: in grocery store lines, on planes, trains, and in automobiles. Yet my favorite place to read has to be the enormous chair and a half that sits in our living room. The room is well lit, and I can see trees outside the window when I bring my eyes up for air. Typically, I have a candle burning so it always smells good, and there’s a lamp nearby for when it gets dark. The chair is squishy enough to sink into, and is big enough to curl my legs to the side. A throw blanket hangs off the arm in case I get chilly, or just feel the need to cozy up. A cup of hot chocolate and I am set! 


Payton Kline

Managing Editor

Favorite Place to Read: In bed

Why: I always love reading in my bed because it usually means I get to go to sleep soon! It’s also such a relaxing place to lay back and get lost in a book, of course, with my kitty by my side. Plus, you just can’t beat all the coziness that comes with the territory of blankets, pillows, and a nightstand candle—there’s nothing like it for reading time. 


Roxanne Bingham

Staff Writer/Communications Coordinator Apprentice

Favorite place to read: On the back porch

Why: My favorite place to read is my back porch, it is unbelievably serene. It has been my favorite spot since I was a little kid and could read. My house backs up to a greenbelt with a creek, so aside from the occasional runner/dog walker, it is quiet and peaceful. When the weather is nice, it’s the perfect temperature and a great way to get outside right now without going in public. It is so relaxing I have actually fallen asleep while reading here before! You get to be surrounded by nature and read a book, so it’s really the best of both worlds.


Makenna Knighton

Communications Coordinator

Favorite Place to Read: By the pool

Why: My favorite place to read is sitting in my backyard dipping my feet in the pool, probably because it is just nice to get outside and escape into whatever fictional world I have for that day. I like being able to tell when I am so engaged in my book that I stop hearing the bird calls and feeling the water ripples. There’s no better way to soak up the sun while beating the AZ heat!


Jade Stanton

Staff Writer

Favorite Place to Read: Coffee Shops

Why: Personally, I love reading at coffee shops. Nothing accentuates the (wonderfully) disorienting return to reality after getting lost in a good book like being surrounded by people, music, and the tantalizing smell of coffee. Locally-owned shops also have the added benefit of a calm and cozy atmosphere that ensures your reading experience isn’t hampered by the hustle and bustle of everyday life, as is often the case in other public spaces. Beyond this, a good cup of coffee or tea is an essential part of a complete reading experience. I have grown especially fond of Tempe’s King Coffee: the coffee is superb, there are plenty of cozy reading nooks, and the atmosphere is perfect for diving into a good book. 

If you also love to read in coffee shops and need some ideas, check out our blog post on the 5 Most Readable Coffee Shops in the Valley.


Abhilasha Mandal

Staff Writer

Favorite Place to Read: In bed

Why: Although I can read just about anywhere as soon as I’ve found myself a little nook and tuned off the outside world, my favorite place to read is in bed, just before I’m about to turn in for the day. Other than being cozy and peaceful, it’s also a great way to unwind and coax the body into sleep mode. Reading to sleep is probably the best antidote to stress insomnia.

A little tip: It’s better to read from a printed book than an ebook during this time because the light from the phone can keep you awake.


So there you have it, some of our staff’s favorite places to read. Where is your favorite place to read? Comment below!

Reading With Your Ears: The Pros and Cons of Audiobooks

This time of staying at home, sheltering in place, and social distancing is the perfect opportunity to catch up on your reading. Right now, readers are lucky to have so many options when to comes to getting their literary fix. With hardback, paperback, ebooks, and, of course—the main reason we are here—audiobooks, there is a format for every type of reader. 

I am not a seasoned pro when it comes to the audiobook format. Until recently I avoided them, not out of fear, but because I consider myself to be too tactile of a creature to be able to just listen to a book. I like the feel of the paper beneath my fingers, that quiet little shooshing noise as I turn the pages, and the satisfying weight of whatever novel in which I have lost myself. I was also concerned that I would get distracted and lose my place if I wasn’t visually focused.

Yet, as a reader, I didn’t feel that I would be complete without at least trying an audiobook on for size. So, for my first foray into the audiobook arena I chose a novel that I had read before—a bit of a safety net you could say. At the time of my experiment Doctor Sleep was in the theaters (remember when we could see movies on something other than Netflix?), and I figured Stephen King’s sequel to The Shining would be a good one to cut my teeth on (or perhaps I should say perk my ears up) in anticipation of the cinematic adaptation. Based on that experience, I ended up compiling a list of pros and cons on listening to your literature.


Pro #1 – Master of Multi-Tasking

Without a doubt the audio book format gives you a ton of freedom. Need to do some housework? Plug in, turn on, and off you go. Although, I don’t necessarily recommend listening while vacuuming since the two sounds compete. Have to run an errand? No worries, use your car’s bluetooth and be entertained on the ride. The majority of my listening was done in the car, and the only downside was getting to a juicy bit in the story and having to step out.


Con #1 – You’ve Lost That Touching Feeling

The audiobook experience isn’t a particularly tactile one. I suppose you could lovingly stroke your phone or computer or play with your headphone cord (if you have one) but it is just not the same. Flipping pages, and holding a good solid hardback has its own particular joy.


Pro #2 – Perfectly Portable

All of touchy feely stuff aside, it has to be said that hardbacks and paperbacks are not easy to transport. That lovely weight? It’s not as pleasant when you’ve added pounds to an already overloaded suitcase or backpack. The audio book is far more portable, and you can keep a list of titles at the ready. Dragging three or four books around just isn’t as convenient, or good for your back. 


Con #2 – The Voices in Your Head

Do you know that voice you hear every time the main character speaks in a novel? Me too! If you are listening to a book that you have read before the voice actor might not portray the character the way you imagined. It was a bit of a letdown to discover that Dan Torrance didn’t quite sound the way I expected. The narrator could be too animated, or not animated enough; they may be dull, or their pacing may not suit you. You never know exactly who are you getting when you hit play.


Pro #3 – Accessibility 

Like ebooks, audiobooks can be downloaded within seconds. No trip to the bookstore or library necessary! This feature is even more convenient considering the lockdown situation we are all in. The library offers a plethora of titles for the price of just having a library card, and now, local bookstores like Changing Hands offer them! You can check out their system for purchasing and downloading here.  A quick internet search will give you lots of additional options.


Con #3 – The Price Is Not Always Nice

There is a price for all that accessibility. An audiobook can cost you significantly more than a paperback or ebook. A quick search of bestselling audiobooks through various services revealed prices upwards of $24 with some reaching nearly $40. The same novel in an ebook, paperback, and even hardback format can cost you far less. However, if you are an avid listener, many sites offer a membership deal which makes far more financial sense.


Pro #4 – Storytime

Remember when your kindergarten teacher would gather you in a circle and read a story aloud? I view consuming a novel through the audiobook format to be a different kind of experience in reading—you’ve engaged a whole different sense.


Con #4 – Time Is Not On Your Side

Depending on your individual speed, you can actually spend more time listening to a book rather than reading one. You can adjust the speed in which you listen, so that can help, but I can tell you that it took me quite a bit longer to listen to Doctor Sleep than it did to read it.


So, would I do choose an audiobook again? Sure. It added some variety to my reading routine by giving me flexibility to read where and when I wanted. Would I trust an audiobook for a literature class? Never. Was Doctor Sleep some scary fun with Stephen King? Absolutely!

3 Books You Should Read before You’re Thirteen

Whether or not you’re a nostalgic person, you will never forget your favorite books growing up. Your taste in literature may change, along with your reading habits, but the books you read when you’re young are imprinted in your brain forever. Here are a couple books I read and re-read through middle school, along with one I wish I had read before my teenage years.


What Katy DidSarah Chauncey Woolsey. In college, Sarah Chauncey Woolsey wrote this charming novel under the pen name of Susan Coolidge. It follows Katy Carr, a twelve-year-old daydreamer, into adolescence. As the oldest of six children who lost their mother years ago, she is constantly expected to set an example to her younger siblings, which she often fails to do, but not for lack of enthusiasm. She is reminded of this frequently by her father, Dr. Carr, and Aunt Izzie, a strict disciplinarian who has been raising the children since their mother died. Aunt Izzie’s general disapproval of her only adds to Katy’s disappointment at being “all legs and elbows, and angles and joints.”

Among the many relationships that the book explores, a notable one is the strong bond between Katy and her sister Clover, second oldest of the Carr siblings. Shy, soft-spoken Clover complements Katy’s wild, whimsical nature. Katy doesn’t know exactly what she wants to do when she grows up, but she’s sure it will be something marvelous, and Clover faithfully agrees. Through the countless escapades, Katy grows on you with her wit and artlessness. It is a heartwarming story filled with colorful characters with interesting turns in the plot.


Black BeautyAnna Sewell. This famous autobiography of a horse personifies a handsome black stallion with a white star on his forehead. He begins at his dewy days as a foal on a farm. After he is broken in, he is bought by the village squire. Here he meets a few other horses, some of whom, he realizes, have not been as well-treated as he has. As he grows older, he moves from the countryside to the city, and has a diverse experience at the hands of several owners with varying temperaments. There are instances of animal cruelty in the book that give you the victim’s perspective on the subject.

The theme of empathy towards animals and their reciprocation to it is prominent throughout the book. When Black Beauty describes how uncomfortable it is to wear a bit, and how his first owner takes great care to make sure his breaking in is as comfortable as it can get, his affection for the farmer becomes prominent. Later, he grows to love his first ever groom, John. Black Beauty is the first popular novel to change the way we look at animal welfare, and is a classic for all ages.


Anne of Green GablesL.M. Montgomery. The novel is set in the picturesque, fictional town of Avonlea where life is uneventful until the Cuthberts decide to adopt a boy from an orphanage to help around the farm. Matthew and his sister, Marilla Cuthbert, live in Green Gables, a house on the edge of the woods. When Matthew goes to receive the boy at the station, he is in for a surprise. A fortunate miscommunication brings Anne to Green Gables, which her extraordinarily imaginative mind transforms into something out of a fairy tale—something she frequently does with places and things. The only thing she can’t seem to improve with imagination is her red hair, which she hates.

Through many adventures and misadventures with her “bosom friend,” Diana Barry, and other assorted characters over the course of four years, Anne becomes irreplaceable in the hearts of her family and friends in Avonlea. Although Anne sounds mature for her age when she speaks, mostly because she uses long words, her naeïvete appears every now and then when she gets into scrapes, or when she tries to deal with the awkwardness of entering adolescence. Reading this book is a luxurious experience, full of eloquent descriptions of the most mundane things transformed into something exotic and beautiful through Anne’s eyes.